NZ CEOs not delivering on health and safety best intentions

New Zealand CEOs have voiced their position on the state of health and safety in their workplaces, in a survey commissioned by Deloitte. A couple of things really stand out for us in the survey results.

CEOs have identified health and safety as a key priority within their organisation, citing financial benefits and the key goal of keeping workers safe as incentives. They also see improving safety culture as a key to improving performance.

Interestingly though, the survey also uncovered a gap between their commitment to health and safety and what actually happens in day to day work practices. In fact, a third of CEOs say the risks in their workplace aren’t well described. Despite workplace health and safety being identified as a concern, the efforts to improve are still, as yet, patchy.

When I read reports like this I feel validated in our thinking that there is a real need for improved risk communication in workplaces.

SaferMe is built to help CEOs and their teams identify risks in the workplace, easily document them, and communicate these risks in real time to staff members. The goal here is to tell your team about potential dangers before accidents happen.

The problem with paper forms is they don’t do anything. They sit in a drawer. SaferMe utilises the latest technology to automatically shows risks on maps, allowing people to communicate with photos, and once a risk is identified, workflows can be put into place so your staff can work together to improve safety.

Of course, an easy to use reporting tool is not a silver bullet, and employers need to come up with strategies and tactics to create a culture which engages staff in the health and safety process. However, real-time feedback from upper management on everyday risks identified in the field does tend to send a strong message.

With SaferMe there’s never an excuse for someone not to be aware of a risk.

If employees walk blindly around a workplace, unaware of the risk around them, they perceive their workplace as being safe, and they often do not know about a risk until it’s too late. Little wonder they don’t take efforts to engage, and health and safety reporting can be described as patchy.

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